189H Seminars

Fall 2018

All first-time freshman students in the University Honors Program are required to take one 189H seminar in the fall semester of their first year at UNL. These seminars are intended for a generalist audience, which is to say that no special preparation is necessary: the student interested in the sciences would be perfectly comfortable and successful in a Music seminar and the student interested in art is prepared for and would benefit from a Political Science seminar.

The following course descriptions will acquaint you with each of the 189H seminars for 2017-18. Before you attend NSE, please identify at least three courses you may wish to take. Please be aware that courses required for your major will dictate your schedule and there are limited seats in each course, which means you may not be able to enroll in your first choice of Honors seminar. However, most students are able to take one of their top choices.

From Mad Men to Fake News: Ethical Persuasion in Advertising & Marketing

ADPR 189H (Advertising & Public Relations)

No.: **** Section: 001 9:30-10:45a, Tu Th
ANDN 228 Professor N. Mitchell ACE 8

Course description

Publicity. Propaganda. Hype. Rhetoric. Promotion. Flimflam. Public Relations. Spin. Fake News. All these terms describe uses of persuasion with varying levels of ethical implications. All communication is persuasive in some way, so how do we sort through what others tell us to find the truth and how do we act as ethical communicators ourselves, both personally and professionally? This course will enable you to become familiar with a variety of ethical issues in advertising, public relations, and marketing and examine their impact on contemporary society. The skills you will learn will aid you in your everyday lives and in your future professions, as they are applicable to any major or future goal.

Anthropology UX: Effective Design for the User Experience

ANTH 189H (Anthropology)

No.: **** Section: 001 5:00-7:30p, We
Burnett 121 Professor L. Wandsnider ACE 9

Course description

What makes us human? How do our cultural and society shape how we live our lives? Anthropology is the study of human culture, and anthropological concepts and methods play increasingly critical roles in the design of 21st century tools, apps, interfaces, and systems; in turn, these design elements shape how end users experience such products and processes. Working in teams as consultants, students will apply fundamental anthropological concepts to provide guidance in the design of a tool or process, taking into account the ethical aspects of this enterprise. Team recommendations will be reviewed by a jury.

Street Art: Visual Voice in the Urban Environment

ARTP 189H (Art Theory & Practice)

No.: **** Section: 001 3:30-4:45p, TuTh
Brace 208 Professor S. Williams ACE 2 or 7

Course description

From spray-painted graffiti to community murals, from guerrilla street sign campaigns to sidewalk chalking, the wide, wonderful practice of street art (both pre-approved and unsanctioned) has grown in stature and importance in the public consciousness since the mid-1960s. In this class, we will explore how street art practices highlight the unique relationships that develop between artists, communities, and society-at-large within the urban environment. We will study this public form of expression from early graffiti writing and the birth of hip hop, to its current use as the voice of resistance and protest. Street art’s power can be double-edged. Artists contribute to creative placemaking and transforming neighborhoods, but simultaneously can open the door to gentrification. This project-based class facilitates an understanding of the practices, style and struggles of street art by tackling subject matter such intersectionality, the environment, personal expression and public interventions.

No artistic experience is necessary but an open mind and the ability to embrace experimental practices is expected!

Scream! Understanding Violence and Horror in Visual Culture

ARTP 189H (Art Theory & Practice)

No.: **** Section: 002 2:00-3:15p, TuTh
Richards 14 Professor S. Williams ACE 2 or 7

Course description

Violent images surround us daily—in the news, on billboards and advertisements, and in movies and TV shows, especially those in the horror genre. In popular media, these images are often presented in a way that makes the violence “pretty,” stylized, or even attractive. This may seem like a new phenomenon, but in reality humans have long used depictions of violence and cruelty in visual media and culture to explore social tensions, ethical questions, and the nature of humanity. In this class, we will explore how violent imagery in paintings, prints, and films offer insight into the various socio-historical contexts in which the artwork was produced. Through weekly screenings, lectures, and critical readings, students will consider how the horror genre has served as a barometer for cultural anxieties at particular historic moments. Key topics include: cultural traditions of horror; horror and repression/the unconscious; the abject body; normality and monstrosity; gender and sexuality in horrorism; horror and technology; fandom and the pleasures of horror.

Great Thinkers in Genetics & Evolution

BIOS 189H (Biological Sciences)

No.: **** Section: 001 8:00-9:15a, TuTh
Beadle N176 Professor A. Christiansen ACE 4

Course description

Students will read, discuss and write about some important ideas in genetics and evolution. We will begin with Mendel, founder of the science of genetics, followed by discussions of Darwin’s ideas on natural selection, and progressing to human genome sequencing. This will then be followed by a discussion of major innovations of evolution, such as organelles, vision, warm-blood etc. and will end with the story of human genome sequencing. Be prepared to read and discuss several books, including making brief presentations to the rest of the class, and writing a final paper. We will continuously refer to the scientific method: how hypotheses are generated, how experiments and data are used to test those hypotheses and how the hypotheses can then be refined to become our knowledge base.

Talking about Borders, Walls, & Immigration: Border Theory & Ethical Rhetoric

COMM 189H (Communication Studies)

No.: **** Section: 001 12:30-1:45p, TuTh
NRC 1105 Professor J. Á. Maldonado ACE 8

Course description

What are some of the ethical and unethical considerations that emerge when we create and advocate for certain border policies? What responsibility belongs to citizens in contemporary developed and democratic nations in a range of border discourses? How are notions of national identity formed through visual media, such as film and television? This course is designed to investigate contemporary border issues by intersecting two areas of research: interdisciplinary border theory and the communication traditions known as ethical and critical rhetoric. In this course, students will investigate a variety of geopolitical issues, such as human migrations and human rights violations, trade and contraband, border conflicts, and border disputes. We will pay specific attention to the role of visual culture industries in advancing diverse depictions of global borders. Students will be tasked with demonstrating their engagement with major principles pertaining to border theory through the enactment of ethical and critical rhetoric.

How to Become Creative or Talented

EDPS 189H (Educational Psychology)

No.: **** Section: 002 2:00-4:50p, Tu
TEAC 139 Professor K. Kiewra ACE 6

Course description

In this class, we will learn about creative and talented people in various domains and explore the psychological, environmental, social, and biological factors that lead to the development of their creativity and/or talent. This field of study offers many implications for self-growth and education. Students read texts and articles, interview talented in-class guests, complete a book report and article summary, and conduct a small research project.

From the American Revolution to Hamilton The Musical: American Literature and Social Protest

ENGL 189H (English)

No.: **** Section: 035 9:30-10:45a, TuTh
TBD Professor K. Payne ACE 5

Course description

Aim: This class examines the rich and diverse tradition of social protest literature in the U.S. Together we will read and examine social protest literature by prominent Americans from the 18th century to our present day. Along the way, we will look at writings that treat a diverse range of social movements and perspectives: from Abigail Adams bold appeal for women’s rights in 1776 to the writings of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs on their escape from slavery; from the government’s removal of Native American children from their homes and forced relocation to Indian boarding schools in the 1880s to W. E. B. Du Bois’ argument for equal access to education for African Americans in the early 20th century; from the Civil Rights movements for black, LGBT, and women’s rights in the mid-20th century to Black Lives Matter today.

Russian and American Literature during the Cold War

ENGL 189H (English)

No.: **** Section: 040 11:00-12:15p, TuTh
ANDR 27 Professor Y. Levchenko ACE 5

Course description

U.S.-Russia relations today are a direct result of the long-standing political and military rivalry between the Soviet Union/Russia and the United States after 1945. This course will examine the tensions between the nations and analyze the ways by which American and Russian literature and art reflected/refracted the tensions between the countries. We are going to see how these two cultures struggled to make sense of the intensifying threat of the nuclear war and how they processed the tragedy of the Holocaust. This course will study the turn to popular culture made by the American writers and contrast it with the gradual parting with the Social realism in Russian literary form and content after the death of Stalin. We will finish with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent change in world order. The U.S. saw Russia as the country that lost its position as an empire and Russia resisted this identity imposed by the West. The time when Russia was trying to save its collapsing economy (Yeltsin and then Putin) produced a new Russian literature that made a definite break with the past and stepped into an unknown and unpredictable future.

Sanaa: The Literature & Art of Africa’s Cities

ENGL 189H (ENGLISH)

No.: **** Section: 050 11:30-12:20p, MWF
ANDR 114 Professor N. Muchiri ACE 5

Course description

In this course we’ll be particularly interested in pursuing a critique of the production of images that are easily recognizable as “African” – war, poverty, famine, etc. Why is Africa repeatedly approached as the “always already” known, understood, or assumed? What does it mean to “know” Africa? Do Africans have the ultimate claim to “knowing” the continent? Hence, our point of departure is inquiries that metropolitan Africa invites, or those we might raise. While our journey may help us arrive at answers, the primary focus of the class is learning how to ask profound, interesting, and creative questions that advance our understanding of the continent’s urban life. Throughout the semester, we will interrogate, and listen to, a variety of African voices. Cities in Africa offer both a high concentration of cultural production and a wide variety of individual expression. So, for instance, music will not only serve as a background to our writing exercises, but also as a primary source that we examine and read closely. Other urban voices we examine include: novels, short stories, and photography. Some of these artistic pieces echo each other, but more often than not they argue, debate, and disagree. We will analyze how these declarations borrow from each other, and continuously create novel artistic forms and genres. Finally, the course will ask students to reflect on the role of the imagination in creating, and interpreting, knowledge about an “other.”

Serial Killer Nation: Sex, Violence, and Trauma in Popular Culture

ENGL 189H (English)

No.: **** Section: 060 1:30-2:20p, MWF
ANDR 27 Professor R. Lipscomb ACE 5

Course description

Serial killers, both real and fictional, lurk in the recesses of cultural imaginings emerging in an instant as the representation of what is most monstrous in our natures. This course will explore the serial killer phenomenon, especially as it is manifested in the United States. We will examine the fictional role of serial killers in some of the most popular television series of the new millennium, such as CSI, Criminal Minds, and Law & Order: SVU, and the rise of the serial killer anti-hero such as Hannibal Lecter, whose presence in film and on television now spans more than three decades. We will also examine real world serial killers—disconcerting figures such as Dean Corll, John Wayne Gacy, and Jeffrey Dahmer. As we consider what constitutes these individuals, we will respectfully consider their victims and also the distortion of the social fabric that often masks their activities by looking at individuals in their immediate vicinities as well as the society at large. Reading/viewings may include Thomas Harris’s Silence of the Lambs, Poppy Z. Brite’s Exquisite Corpse, television series such as Hannibal and Dexter, and Academy Award winning portrayals of serial killers by Charlize Theron and Anthony Hopkins. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate research including true crime books, news reports, podcasts, television and YouTube documentaries, court documents and police reports, recorded interviews, and scholarly articles from important journals in the fields of psychology and sociology.

From Zika to Flint, Michigan: Case Studies Exploring Global Public Health and Environmental Justice

ENVR 189H (Enviornmental Studies)

No.: **** Section: 001 11:00-12:15p, TuTh
NRC 2109 Professor C. Haney Douglass ACE 8

Course description

As the global population grows, and our world becomes increasingly interconnected via processes of globalization, our social and natural worlds are becoming further interwoven. International travel creates a pathway for previously limited outbreaks of disease to spread. The internet creates a pathway for the illumination of once hidden social and ecological crimes. This course will explore contemporary public and environmental health case studies from around the world through the lens of environmental justice. Environmental justice involves the fair and equal treatment and involvement of all people in efforts to care for and access environmental resources. We will investigate current cases of environmental concern in urban areas, remote indigenous communities, local and international law, and the development of local and international public health practices and collaborative efforts.

Exploring the Digital Humanities: How New Media are Transforming Art, History, and Literature

HIST 189H (History)

No.: **** Section: 001 9:30-10:45a, TuTh
NRC 2109 Professor J. Coltrain ACE 5

Course description

New digital technologies are rapidly transforming the way scholars study subjects like history, literature, art, and archaeology. Together these innovations are called the digital humanities, and they include projects ranging from 3D virtual reconstructions of ancient cities, to digitized versions of illuminated manuscripts, to interactive museum displays. This class will investigate how scholars are using exciting technologies like social media, cloud computing, game design, and many others for cultural studies. Together we will consider issues like public access and digital property rights, crowd sourcing and online collaboration, digital preservation and standards, the role of creativity and play, the effectiveness of digital education, and the potential of newer technologies still years in the future. In addition to readings and discussion on trends and techniques in the field, students will also have the chance to create their own imaginative proposals for digital humanities projects. No programming or mathematics background is required or recommended for this class.

Love, Death, & Power in Pre-Modern Europe

HIST 189H (History)

No.: **** Section: 002 10:30-11:45a, MW
NRC 2109 Professor C. Levin ACE 5

Course description

Love and power are both often deeply desired, and have been throughout history. And death comes to everyone, sometimes much too violently. This course uses case studies based on historical persons and pieces of literature to examine love, death, and power in various time and places in pre-modern Europe, and learn much about historical and literary concerns that still resonate today. Some of the texts and figures we study include Medea, the mythological wife of Jason, who took terrible revenge when he abandoned her; Boudicca, the Celtic Queen who fought the Roman invaders; the murderous Merovingian queen Fredegund; the scholar/cleric Abelard and his brilliant student and lover Heloise; and Lady Jane Grey, executed in the Tower while still in her teens. We will also be reading Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince, Thomas More’s Utopia, and William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing. Assignments include in-class writing, short interpretive essays based on the readings, a 5-8 page research paper, and a creative final.

America: From Fundamentals to Reality

HIST 189H (History)

No.: **** Section: 003 10:30-11:20a, MWF
NRC 1105 Professor T. Berg ACE 5

Course description

What makes America? How do we define ourselves, and how do we make sense of sometimes competing and polarizing identities and concepts? Stepping away from a traditional historical or political science survey of America, this course examines the various threads of continuity that simultaneously bind the nation together and even sometimes pull it apart. Tracing these subjects from their origins to the present, we shall explore the development of our political philosophy and system of government, the nation’s physical growth, civil rights and civil liberties, federal-state relations, civilian-military relations, race relations, religion and society, wars, and other topics.

Freedom of Expression & the First Amendment

JOUR 189H (Journalism)

No.: **** Section: 001 2:00-3:15p, TuTh
ANDN 114 Professor J Bender ACE 5

Course description

Americans cherish the right to say what they think—but they also value other things such as justice, privacy, decency and fairness. Sometimes freedom of expression collides with one of those other rights we value, leading to some interesting and complex conflicts. The right to express ourselves is specifically delineated in the First Amendment and interpreted in hundreds of laws and court cases since the U.S. Constitution was written. This seminar examines the benefits—and costs—of freedom of expression in various parts of American culture. The course stresses that the right to freedom of expression applies to all citizens, not only to the media. Students will be expected to do frequent writing in various formats and to make occasional oral presentations.

Gender in World Literature

MODL 189H (Modern Languages)

No.: **** Section: 001 8:30-9:20a, MWF
Oldfather 303 Professor N Peterson ACE 5 / WHT-approved section

Course description

In this course, we will uncover some of the complexities -- political, social, and personal -- of how people have confronted and inhabited gender in different times and places. We will examine the role that culture, society, and literature have played in shaping the role of gender in our everyday lives and conversations. Using literary texts as the foundation, we will discuss gender in our own world -- from the #metoo and #timesup movement to the question of to what extent gender is culturally or biologically determined.

A World of Music

MUNM 189H (Music)

No.: **** Section: 001 11:00-12:15a, TuTh
Westbrook 119 Professor T. Bushard ACE 7 or 9

Course description

Music making is one of the most important creative processes experienced by people throughout the world. In this class we will explore various types of music made across the globe and how each culture incorporates music into their daily lives. In addition, we will examine the role of the ethnomusicologist and the various ways in which ethnomusicology contributes to our understanding of music. In order to investigate these diverse topics more thoroughly, we will read and discuss texts that engage the music from (for instance) economic, political, social, racial, and gender perspectives. Further, we will experience the music itself through a variety of interactive and participatory media. The class will culminate with a musical ethnography project and presentation wherein students will have the opportunity to explore music making in the greater Lincoln community.

Psychology of Music

MUSC 189H (MUSIC)

No.: **** Section: 002 9:30-10:45a, TuTh
Westbrook 9 Professor R. Woody ACE 7

Course description

Throughout time, human beings have been fascinated with music. Research in the psychology of music has uncovered much regarding how musicians acquire the ability to convey emotional intentions as sounded music, how listeners perceive it as feelings and moods, and how this powerful process relates to social and cultural dynamics. This course addresses these broad themes, giving specific attention to topics such as: development and learning, motivation, expressivity and artistic interpretation, creativity, performance anxiety, listener preferences and emotional response, and the roles of music in society.

The 21st Century Scholar/Artist:  Digital Music Creation

MUSC 189H (Music)

No.: **** Section: 003 12:30-1:45p, TuTh
Richards 17 Professor B. Moore ACE 7

Course description

In areas of musical and artistic creativity, digital media has become an important aural and visual palette for expression. The ability to be creative and communicate in an expressive and compelling manner are also important skills in today’s world. The iPad has transformed both the process and product of musical creation. This seminar seeks to (1) understand the expressive aspects of music as an art form through learning to compose and create original music, (2) develop and equip students with the skills and knowledge to use personal and multimedia technology within the context of musical and artistic creation and scholarship, and (3) be an active participant in the research/creative process of the development and deployment of new technologies. NOTE: This seminar requires each student to have access to an Apple iPad. For those enrolled students that do not have an iPad, one will be made available for checkout as well as access to creativity software/hardware for music production, graphic design, and video production.

Exploring Music & the Arts in Today's World

MUSC 189H (Music)

No.: **** Section: 004 12:30-1:45p, Tu Th
Westbrook 114 Professor J. Mattingly ACE 7 / WHT-approved section

Course description

This seminar will consider and discuss the nature and function of the arts in today’s society. The course will examine the creative process through a variety of disciplines including music, dance, theatre, and art. Each of these areas will be addressed through the required reading materials and assignments. In addition to traditional class lectures, the class will tour several arts establishments including the Lied, the Sheldon Museum of Art, as well as visiting several sculptures across campus. Throughout the course, we will address questions such as: What should the arts do for us? Who should support the arts? What are the economic, political, historical, and social influences on the arts? What role do we as an audience play in the arts? No previous musical or artistic knowledge or experience is necessary to take this course.

Sounds of the Gods: Film Scores of Superhero Movies

MUSC 189H (Music)

No.: **** Section: 005 8:30-9:20a, MWF
Westbrook 114 Professor G. Hope ACE 7

Course description

From Batman to Spider-man and from Indiana Jones to Harry Potter, the musical scores of superhero films tell the story of Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey. In this class you will examine the use of Wagnerian leitmotifs, story-telling, and musical drama in the scores, as well as how the movies comment on and critique culture.

Current Issues in American Politics

POLS 189H (Political Science)

No.: **** Section: 001 9:30-10:20a, MWF
OLDH 538 Professor J. Gruhl ACE 6

Course description

An examination of current and controversial issues in American politics. The first half of the seminar will focus on the size and role of our government, pitting small-government advocates against big-government advocates—those who want to cut government programs versus those who want to continue or expand them. We’ll examine the debates between conservatives and liberals and between Republicans and Democrats. We’ll compare the policies of recent presidents, including those by President Obama and some by President Trump. The second half of the seminar will focus on the polarization of American politics and political parties. Why are we so polarized today, and what are the consequences? In this context, we’ll look at the 2016 presidential election and events since then. We’ll also look at the phenomenon of fake news. For most students, the information presented in class and in the readings will be eye-opening. Even so, the course will be a serious examination of these issues—not simply a “current events” class that discusses the latest headlines or argues hot-button issues. The reading will be substantial, and the writing will entail a series of short papers based on the reading. The course will include lectures and discussions, and all students will participate with questions and comments.

The Many Faces of Tyrrany

POLS 189H (Political Science)

No.: **** Section: 002 11:30-12:20p, MWF
Neihardt 1105 Professor D. Beahm ACE 6

Course description

History is full of tyrannical leaders, such as Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolin, Josip Broz Tito, Mao Zedong, many of whom gained power before the full scope of their intentions were clear. As active citizens, we have an obligation to work to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. This course is an analysis and evaluation of the subject of tyranny from multiple points of view. Students will read, discuss, view videos and write about what some of the foremost authorities have had to say about the topic. We will learn from political theorists as ancient as Plato, to Hannah Arendt’s examination of the development of totalitarianism in Nazi Germany, on through to contemporary views of what tyranny is, and how it manifests itself in governments, societies, and individuals.

Liberty and Justice for All?
Using Behavioral Science
to Understand the
American Criminal Justice System

PSYC 189H (Psychology)

No.: **** Section: 001 2:30-3:45p, MW
Neihardt 1105 Professor Colin Holloway ACE 6

Course description

Questions about the fairness and effectiveness of the U.S. criminal justice system have become commonplace and are asked by citizens across the political spectrum in legislative halls, courthouses, education, entertainment, social media, and sports. In this non-partisan course, we will utilize behavioral sciences to understand why people with various roles in the system behave as they do, including police, lawyers, jurors, voters, and law or rule-makers. We will think critically about their actions and the outcome of those actions in relation to the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. We will seek to understand multiple, and sometimes conflicting perspectives, in order to sharpen our critical thinking and analysis skills. We will use research to look beyond what people working in the system, politicians, and activists say should happen, to understand what actually does happen and why.

Psychology of Gender

PSYC 189H (Psychology)

No.: **** Section: 002 8:00-9:15a, TuTh
NRC 2109 Professor A. Riemer ACE 6

Course description

Whether you realize it or not, your sex and gender likely play a significant role in your everyday life. Relying on psychological science, this course will help you understand and critically examine the ways in which sex and gender are defined and enacted at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, intergroup, and societal levels. Topics will include gender differences and similarities, gender stereotypes and sexual objectification, gender development, sexism, gendered violence, sexual identity (e.g., LGTBQ), gender in the workplace, and health. Current “hot” topics (e.g., transgender prejudice, women’s underrepresentation in STEM, men’s risk-taking behaviors, the glass ceiling in politics) will be discussed.

Sex and Society

SOCI 189H (Sociology)

No.: **** Section: 001 9:30-10:45a, Tu Th
HENZ 109 Professor E. Kazyak ACE 9

Course description

What’s society got to do with sex? Isn’t sex something intimate, natural, and private? In this course we will examine how our ideas, identities, and experiences related to sex are shaped by our social context. Some of the topics we will cover include sex education in schools and in families, the #MeToo movement, and the coming out experiences of LGBTQ people. Throughout the class we will discuss what messages we learn about sex, bodies, gender, and sexuality; where we learn these messages; and how those messages have changed and differ across cultural contexts.

Left Behind: Working Class Families in the Contemporary U.S.

SOCI 189H (Sociology)

No.: **** Section: 002 11:00-12:15a, TuTh
Bessey 108 Professor D. Warner ACE 9

Course description

Following the 2016 election, the media settled on a narrative that the economic misfortunes of the “working class” led to a backlash against establishment politics. Analysts called for political parties to pay attention to the “forgotten” and “invisible” blue-collar worker. The fact is the economic and, as we will discover, cultural marginalization of working class Americans is not new. And there is a long tradition of sociological research on the issue. We will read contemporary books that will allow us to explore—through rigorous class discussion and analytical writing—how the relative economic position of the working class has continued to erode over time, how this has affected their families and interpersonal relationships, and how they make sense of and interpret these changes. Our exploration will cover topics related to social class, race/ethnicity, gender and masculinities, work, emotions, and politics.

Performances of the East

THEA 189H (Theatre)

No.: **** Section: 001 12:30-1:20p, MWF
NRC 1105 Professor S. Imes-Borden ACE 7 or 9

Course description

For millennia, a rich and diverse theatre scene has existed in Asia, the Middle East and Africa. From the birth of kabuki to college stomp competitions, we will examine performances in the East and how they have influenced what we see in America today. This class will be interactive and engaging, with extensive historical content and debate about what theatre means to civilization at this moment. Specific traditions discussed will include China, Japan, Korea, India, Iran, South Africa and Nigeria. Students will also explore the theatre of various Eastern nations they themselves choose.

Stage Warriors

THEA 189H (Theatre)

No.: **** Section: 002 1:20-2:20p, MWF
NRC 1105 Professor S. Imes-Borden ACE 7 or 9

Course description

What makes someone perform onstage even when that performance endangers her livelihood, her family, her personal safety or her life? Why does that danger exist? What is she doing and why is it threatening? This class is a comprehensive look at real women who participated in interviews to answer these questions. We’ll also examine the political and social structures of culture and why feminism or theatre can be dangerous. Students will research their own warriors who do dangerous or non-traditional work in the field of their major. If you ever wondered if theatre can be more than lighthearted entertainment, this class answers “yes.”

From Wonder Woman to Supergirl: American Female Action Heroes

WMNS 189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

No.: **** Section: 001 9:30-10:45a, TuTh
NRC 1105 Professor T. Burnett ACE 9 / WHT-approved section

Course description

In 2017, the film Wonder Woman offered viewers a refreshingly 21st-century, socially conscious, and feminist conceptualization of what a female action hero could be. For years, movie studios have resisted female-led—never mind female-directed—blockbuster action films. This attitude and absence of many competitors suggest that Wonder Woman stands alone in our popular imagination. In truth, the film’s success is a culmination of a long and fascinating history of female action heroes in American culture. In this class we will explore that history of female action heroes in 20th and 21st century American popular culture, primarily in film and television, but also in other media. We will examine these figures in the comparison to their male counterparts and traditional heroic archetypes, and consider female action heroes within the context of the evolution of feminism(s) and changing attitudes about women’s strength, abilities, and roles in society.

Haunted Women in Literature & Film

WMNS 189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

No.: **** Section: 002 6:00-7:15p, MW
NRC 2109 Professor K. Lacey ACE 9

Course description

The lady in white. The specter of the teenager who died on prom night, her lilac dress floating behind her. A mother hearing her dead children cry. A daughter who still hears the tap, tap, tap of her dead mother’s cane. The vision of a seafarer’s wife holding a lantern looking for her long-lost love. Haunted women—those who haunt as well as those who are haunted—are a staple in literature and film. In this class, we will read classic and contemporary literature and film to examine the ways in which filmmakers and female authors have used the concept of “haunting” and the supernatural to make larger comments about female coming of age, marriage, motherhood, and social roles throughout history. We will also study classic myths and folklore to explore the role of the supernatural in cultural identity and community. A tentative list of texts include Beloved, Rebecca, and The Haunting, while some of the films may include The Orphanage, The Woman in Black, and Crimson Peak. Assignments include literary and film analysis, an original ghost story, and a presentation.

Haunted Women in Literature & Film

WMNS 189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

No.: **** Section: 003 3:30-4:45p, MW
NRC 2109 Professor Y. Levchenko ACE 9

Course description

The lady in white. The specter of the teenager who died on prom night, her lilac dress floating behind her. A mother hearing her dead children cry. A daughter who still hears the tap, tap, tap of her dead mother’s cane. The vision of a seafarer’s wife holding a lantern looking for her long-lost love. Haunted women—those who haunt as well as those who are haunted—are a staple in literature and film. In this class, we will read classic and contemporary literature and film to examine the ways in which filmmakers and female authors have used the concept of “haunting” and the supernatural to make larger comments about female coming of age, marriage, motherhood, and social roles throughout history. We will also study classic myths and folklore to explore the role of the supernatural in cultural identity and community. A tentative list of texts include Beloved, Rebecca, and The Haunting, while some of the films may include The Orphanage, The Woman in Black, and Crimson Peak. Assignments include literary and film analysis, an original ghost story, and a presentation.