Fall 2021

All new first-year students in the University Honors Program take one 189H seminar in the fall semester of their first year at UNL. These are extremely popular and students often reference these as among their favorite classes at UNL! All seminars are taught by excellent faculty who are passionate about Honors education. All seminars are offered via an in-person format, unless otherwise noted in description.

The 189H seminars all meet different ACE (general education) requirements. Before your NSE virtual advising appointment, please review the following course descriptions and identify several that interest you. You and your advisor will discuss which seminars and ACE courses are most appropriate for your degree plan.

ACE 2: Oral Communication/Visual Literacy

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Exposure to Light: A History of Photography

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 005 M/W 5:00-6:15pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course covers the history of photography from its inception to today through slide lectures, discussions, and activities as outlined. Emphasis is the practice of photography and the individual photographer’s development in the history of the medium. Discussion surrounding the social, political, and artistic uses of photography and imaging are also a major component of the class. Slide lectures cover art photography, documentary, editorial, fashion, feminist, post-modern, multicultural, and digital photography. This class also includes a field trip, two exams, creation of response photographs, written reflection essays, and project in conjunction with a research paper and class presentation.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

The Graffiti Revolution

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 004 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Richards 14 Professor Sandra Williams ACE 2 or 7

From spray-painted graffiti to community murals, from guerrilla street sign campaigns to sidewalk chalking, the wide, wonderful practice of street art (both pre-approved and unsanctioned) has grown in stature and importance in the public consciousness since the mid-1960s--it is a graffiti revolution! In this class, we will explore how graffiti practices highlight the unique relationships that develop between artists, communities, and society-at-large within the urban environment. We will study this public form of expression from early graffiti writing and the birth of hip hop, to its current use as the voice of resistance and protest. Graffiti’s power can be double-edged. Artists contribute to creative placemaking and transforming neighborhoods, but simultaneously can open the door to gentrification. This project-based class facilitates an understanding of the practices, style and struggles of street art by tackling subject matter such intersectionality, the environment, personal expression and public interventions.

No artistic experience is necessary, but an open mind and the ability to embrace experimental practices is expected!

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Looking at Video Art

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 003 M/W 3:30-4:45pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course surveys the history of video art from its inception in the 1960s to today through lectures, partial and full-length video screenings, discussions, two exams, and visual and written activities. Emphasis is the development of video art as a genre and its practitioners from fluxus, conceptual, structural, feminist, postmodern, deconstruction, multi-cultural, globalization, postcolonial, identity politics, to environmental viewpoints. Lectures situate works of video art and artists through historical and theoretical contexts. Discussions uncover social, political, and artistic intentions and frameworks. The visual making and written activities develop critical thinking about ideas and concepts. Any digital moving image camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to HD recorder). Basic introduction to camera controls, techniques, and editing software are covered. Completion of this course enables the student to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct considered solutions, whether concepts or moving image manifestations. There are no prerequisites for this course.

ACE 4: Natural and Physical Sciences

189H (Biological Sciences)

Exploring Evolution, Cells, and Genomes

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 007 Tu/Th 8:00-9:15am
Knoll 150 Dr. Alan Christensen ACE 4

In this course, we will read and discuss approximately five books describing various aspects of evolution, genetics, cells, the genome and genome modifications. This may include such works as “The Beak of the Finch” by Jonathan Weiner, “Life Ascending” by Nick Lane, “A Crack in Creation” by Jennifer Doudna and Samuel Sternberg, and “A Life Decoded” by J. Craig Venter. Other topics involving the intersection of genetics and evolution may also be covered. Because this is an ACE4 course, we will focus on the scientific method, framing and testing hypotheses, interpretation of data, and drawing and evaluating conclusions. The scientific method is central to all of these topics, and students are expected to thoroughly understand it, and be able to discuss the topics within this framework. Evaluation of student accomplishments will be done by a class presentation, a debate, written assignments, discussion in class, and a final paper.

Cornfield

189H (Biological Sciences)

Food Systems, Diets, & Climate Change

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 007 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45p
Beadle N172 Dr. Heriberto Cerutti ACE 4

Providing a growing global population with healthy diets based on sustainable food production systems is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Choices made by producers (e.g., technologies and agricultural practices), market agents (e.g., transport, storage, processing and selling of food) and consumers (e.g., dietary patterns) depend on multiple factors and have major impacts on society and our planet. In this course, we will explore current food systems (e.g., global production, processing, trade, consumption and waste), their driving trends (e.g., population growth, income, dietary habits, globalization) and impacts (e.g., human health, food security, climate change) as well as the challenges of redesigning food systems. The course will rely on reading and critically evaluating, using the principles of the scientific method, research papers and reports from academic groups, non-profit organizations and government agencies. Group projects will focus on specific case studies such as plant-based burgers, AquAdvantage salmon, Artic apple and fortified foods. Evaluation of student accomplishments will be done by written assignments, discussions in class, a group project and a class presentation.

ACE 5: Humanities

189H (Journalism)

Freedom of Speech in Contentious Times

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 015 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Knoll 258 Dr. John Bender ACE 5

Americans cherish the right to say what they think—but they also value other things such as justice, privacy, decency and fairness. Sometimes freedom of expression collides with one of those other rights we value, leading to some interesting and complex conflicts. The right to express ourselves is specifically delineated in the First Amendment and interpreted in hundreds of laws and court cases since the U.S. Constitution was written. This seminar examines the benefits—and costs—of freedom of expression in various parts of American culture. The course stresses that the right to freedom of expression applies to all citizens, not only to the media. Students will be expected to do frequent writing in various formats and to make occasional oral presentations.

Books on a shelf

189H (English)

Illness, Sickness, and Recovery in Literature

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 010 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Andrews Hall Dr. Amanda Gailey ACE 5

In this class we will explore how selected authors have responded to disease, illness, and sickness in their writing. Reading a variety of genres (novels, poems, nonfiction), mostly by U.S. authors, we will study how historical conceptions of physical and mental illness related to prevalent religious and political philosophies. We will also consider how writing has played a unique role in recovery from illness.

Security camera

189H (English)

An Introduction to Surveillance Culture

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 011 M/W/F 9:30-10:20am
Andrews 30 Dr. Adrian Wisnicki ACE 5

What does it mean to be under surveillance? To be part of a surveillance culture? To live in a surveillance state? How have the internet and the rise of big tech companies changed the possibilities for and enactment of total societal surveillance? And, in the modern state, how do factors such as government, race, and gender inflect the practices of surveillance? This course will explore such questions. We will consider how the topic of surveillance has been addressed and represented in literary works and films from the last hundred years by authors from North America and Europe. We will engage in theoretical reflections on the practice of surveillance using a selections from a set of touchstone critical works. Finally, we will draw on our primary and critical readings plus articles from the contemporary press to reflect on the evolution of surveillance practices from the early twentieth century to the present. As part of this, we will give particular attention to how a range of contemporary technologies have enabled commercially-led surveillance on a scale never before possible in human history.

189H (History)

Out of Our Past: America from the Enlightenment to Present

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 014 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Knoll 150 Dr. Tim Borstelmann ACE 5

This course will provide a one-semester overview of the historical development of the contemporary United States. We will first explore the pre-history of the country, focusing on the Enlightenment, the Protestant Reformation, European colonialism, the African slave trade, and the American Revolution. Next we will examine the creation of the powerful modern American state, digging into the processes of continental expansion, industrialization, immigration and the two World Wars. Finally, we will wrestle with key contemporary U.S. challenges, most notably the Cold War, struggles for social justice, the rise of conservatism, globalization, climate change, and technological innovation. The seminar offers an opportunity to consider creatively and collectively the most important historical themes and issues of the past 500 years—a foundation for an educated citizen.

Illustration of a Viking ship

189H (History)

Raiding, Trading, and Praying in the Viking Age

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 013 M/W/F 12:30-1:20pm
Knoll 150 Dr. Angela Bolen ACE 5

This class will explore Viking culture, looking at several aspects including their role as fearsome conquerors and explorers, their relationships with other cultures and peoples through trade, and the influence of their faith systems on their culture, as well as how they viewed these figures of myth and legend that have lived on to today in various forms.

Illustration of a robot

189H (English)

Science, Technology, & the Body

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 013 Tu/Th 2:00-3:15pm
Andrews Hall Dr. Peter Capuano ACE 5

This seminar examines the crossings of technology and the human form beginning with the industrial revolution in Britain but extending to Hollywood cinema. Our readings of essays, poetry, fiction, art, and film will address the “trouble” of what Sigmund Freud called man’s technologically-advanced “auxiliary organs.” In this context, we will grapple with the paradox of the ways in which technology both improves and diminishes our lives, with special attention devoted to what role(s) art plays in the representation of this central paradox. We will also consider how sophisticated technologies ranging from machine development to biomedical engineering, artificial intelligence, cosmetic surgery, and the pharmaceutical fine-tuning of personality expand the boundaries of what it means to be human.

ACE 6: Social Sciences

189H (Political Science)

Current Issues in American Politics

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 021 M/W/F 9:30-10:20am
Oldfather 538 Dr. John Gruhl ACE 6

An examination of current and controversial issues in American politics. The first half of the seminar will focus on the size and role of our government, pitting small-government advocates against big-government advocates—those who want to cut government programs versus those who want to continue or expand them. We’ll examine the debates between conservatives and liberals and between Republicans and Democrats. We’ll compare the policies of recent presidents, including those by President Obama and some by President Trump. The second half of the seminar will focus on the polarization of American politics and political parties. Why are we so polarized today, and what are the consequences? In this context, we’ll look at the 2016 presidential election and events since then. We’ll also look at the phenomenon of fake news. For most students, the information presented in class and in the readings will be eye-opening. Even so, the course will be a serious examination of these issues—not simply a “current events” class that discusses the latest headlines or argues hot-button issues. The reading will be substantial, and the writing will entail a series of short papers based on the reading. The course will include lectures and discussions, and all students will participate with questions and comments.

189H (Educational Psychology)

How to Become Creative or Talented

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 009 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Knoll 150 Dr. Ken Kiewra ACE 6

In this class, we will learn about creative and talented people in various domains and explore the psychological, environmental, social, and biological factors that lead to the development of their creativity and/or talent. This field of study offers many implications for self-growth and education. Students read texts and articles, interview talented in-class guests, complete a book report and article summary, and conduct a small research project.

189H (Political Science)

The Many Faces of Tyranny

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 022 Tu/Th 8:00-9:15am
Knoll 258 Dr. Don Beahm ACE 6

History is full of tyrannical leaders, such as Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolin, Josip Broz Tito, Mao Zedong, many of whom gained power before the full scope of their intentions were clear. As active citizens, we have an obligation to work to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. This course is an analysis and evaluation of the subject of tyranny from multiple points of view. Students will read, discuss, view videos and write about what some of the foremost authorities have had to say about the topic. We will learn from political theorists as ancient as Plato, to Hannah Arendt’s examination of the development of totalitarianism in Nazi Germany, on through to contemporary views of what tyranny is, and how it manifests itself in governments, societies, and individuals.

189H (Psychology)

The Neuroscience of Zombies

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 023 M/W/F 10:30-11:20am
Knoll 150 Dr. Jacquelyn Omelian ACE 6

We all know that zombies aren’t real… right? But what about a parasite that makes mice lose their fear of cats and end up as lunch? Or a virus that makes people terrified of a glass of water? In this class, we’ll sort the fact from the fiction and explore the wonderfully weird world of the brain. Using cases of both real and fictional disorders, we will explore the ways in which the typical brain functions. Along the way we will cover common neuroscience methodologies, important historical contributions, and relevant current theories. By the end of this course you will have developed a broad understanding of the field of neuroscience and be well prepared to repel a zombie apocalypse, should one occur.

189H (Psychology)

The Psychology of Good and Evil

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 024 Tu/Th 2:00-3:15pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Chelsea Witt ACE 6

From the earliest historical records, humans have been trying to figure out how some people become heroes and others villains. Explanations have been offered by many religious and philosophical traditions, and laws attempt to legislate exactly what is wrong about some of our strongly-held impulses. This class will examine how we define what is good and evil and will require personal reflection, experiential learning, critical readings, and discussions based on a psychological analysis of why and how we define acts as good or evil. We will conduct this analysis through a lens of different areas of psychology: human development, neuroscience, social relationships, mental illness, the law, and religion. It is the goal of this course to help students view morality in a variety of scientific contexts and equip them to critically reflect on their own moral lives.

ACE 7: Fine Arts

189H (English)

100 Years of Film

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 026 MWF 2:30-3:20pm
Knoll 150 Dr. Michael Page ACE 7

For over one hundred years we have been enthralled by the movies! Undoubtedly film is the central mode of artistic cultural expression in our world today. Much of our social discourse revolves around our shared experiences of the cinema. In this course, students will explore the worlds of film by 1. Watching; 2. Reading (both films and screenplays); 3. Contextualizing; 4. Talking (in class discourse); 5. Writing (both analytically and creatively), and, last but not least, 6. Enjoying the pleasures of the cinema. This Honors seminar will introduce students to the art of film and the craft of screenwriting; key moments of film history and the social, historical, and artistic context surrounding the films; and, through the reading of screenplays, how films develop from page to screen. Students will not only watch some of the great films of the last 100 years, but they will also learn how to read films as “texts,” by applying analytical and critical methods to their viewing of films. As we view/read the films, students will also have the opportunity to read a number of screenplays (and a few short novels) to learn the craft of screenwriting, and they will write their own short screenplay as one of their class projects. Students will also learn the craft of the film review by writing two film reviews during the course of the semester.

Brain illustration

189H (English)

Creativity and Citizenship

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 027 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Stephen Behrendt ACE 7

This seminar considers the dynamic relationship between “creativity” and “citizenship” by examining the broad range of assumptions, artifacts and practices involved in both terms. “Creativity” involves more than just the production, performance and consumption of “works of art”; it includes, more broadly, innovation and initiative across both disciplinary and cultural boundaries ranging from the sciences and technology to civic institutions and socio-cultural practices. Similarly, “Citizenship” involves more than mere local, national or geographical “membership”; it includes cultural behaviors whose origins and consequences range from the personal and private to broadly public, national and global spheres of action, influence and socio-political practice..

The seminar explores questions that follow from this central one: Where and how do these capacious “spheres” intersect, both for individuals and for the socio-cultural institutions in which they participate? In exploring this central question, we will study creative works in various media (with copious examples from various media) as well as critical and theoretical writings. Students will present examples and perspectives from their own experience and interests and will create works that explore the dynamic relationship among the arts, culture and contemporary civic consciousness and engagement.

189H (Music)

Digital Music Creation

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 019 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Ross/Van Brunt 213 Dr. Brian Moore ACE 7

In areas of musical and artistic creativity, digital media has become an important aural and visual palette for expression. The ability to be creative and communicate in an expressive and compelling manner are also important skills in today’s world. The iPad has transformed both the process and product of musical creation. This seminar seeks to (1) understand the expressive aspects of music as an art form through learning to compose and create original music, (2) develop and equip students with the skills and knowledge to use personal and multimedia technology within the context of musical and artistic creation and scholarship, and (3) be an active participant in the research/creative process of the development and deployment of new technologies. NOTE: This seminar requires each student to have access to an Apple iPad. For those enrolled students that do not have an iPad, one will be made available for checkout as well as access to creativity software/hardware for music production, graphic design, and video production.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Exposure to Light: A History of Photography

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 005 M/W 5:00-6:15pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course covers the history of photography from its inception to today through slide lectures, discussions, and activities as outlined. Emphasis is the practice of photography and the individual photographer’s development in the history of the medium. Discussion surrounding the social, political, and artistic uses of photography and imaging are also a major component of the class. Slide lectures cover art photography, documentary, editorial, fashion, feminist, post-modern, multicultural, and digital photography. This class also includes a field trip, two exams, creation of response photographs, written reflection essays, and project in conjunction with a research paper and class presentation.

189H (Theatre)

Games, Festivals, Theatre, and Sports: Cultural Rituals of Performance and Play

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course we will use foundational theories to unpack and understand cultural rituals of performance and play, such as festivals, immersive theatre, video games, and sports. We will investigate the function of performance and play in society, communities, and in our daily lives; we will also investigate how performance and play impact the formation and expression of individual and cultural identities around the globe. We will also look at the role of history, economics, and technology in the international production and circulation of cultural rituals, as well as examine and appreciate their material and aesthetic compositions, narrative representations, and entertainment values. While we will use writing, research, and discussion as our main modes of inquiry, we will also interact with these cultural rituals firsthand through viewing performances and documentaries and playing video games as a part of our course work.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

The Graffiti Revolution

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 004 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Richards 14 Professor Sandra Williams ACE 2 or 7

From spray-painted graffiti to community murals, from guerrilla street sign campaigns to sidewalk chalking, the wide, wonderful practice of street art (both pre-approved and unsanctioned) has grown in stature and importance in the public consciousness since the mid-1960s--it is a graffiti revolution! In this class, we will explore how graffiti practices highlight the unique relationships that develop between artists, communities, and society-at-large within the urban environment. We will study this public form of expression from early graffiti writing and the birth of hip hop, to its current use as the voice of resistance and protest. Graffiti’s power can be double-edged. Artists contribute to creative placemaking and transforming neighborhoods, but simultaneously can open the door to gentrification. This project-based class facilitates an understanding of the practices, style and struggles of street art by tackling subject matter such intersectionality, the environment, personal expression and public interventions.

No artistic experience is necessary, but an open mind and the ability to embrace experimental practices is expected!

189H (Music)

How to Listen to Pop Songs

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 020 M/W/F 8:30-9:20am
Westbrook 104 Dr. David von Kampen ACE 7

Popular music’s visual marketing permeates our culture, with songwriters and bands using images and music videos to catch our attention. But music is made for ears, and pop songs deserve to be considered on their own purely musical terms. In this class we’ll listen to a wide variety of songs—Frank Sinatra to the Beach Boys to Stevie Wonder to Ben Folds to Taylor Swift—and many others in between. We will figure out what makes a great song great, and how new ways of listening can deepen your enjoyment of your favorite music.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Looking at Video Art

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 003 M/W 3:30-4:45pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course surveys the history of video art from its inception in the 1960s to today through lectures, partial and full-length video screenings, discussions, two exams, and visual and written activities. Emphasis is the development of video art as a genre and its practitioners from fluxus, conceptual, structural, feminist, postmodern, deconstruction, multi-cultural, globalization, postcolonial, identity politics, to environmental viewpoints. Lectures situate works of video art and artists through historical and theoretical contexts. Discussions uncover social, political, and artistic intentions and frameworks. The visual making and written activities develop critical thinking about ideas and concepts. Any digital moving image camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to HD recorder). Basic introduction to camera controls, techniques, and editing software are covered. Completion of this course enables the student to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct considered solutions, whether concepts or moving image manifestations. There are no prerequisites for this course.

189H (Music)

Psychology of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 018 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Westbrook 9 Dr. Robert Woody ACE 7

Throughout time, human beings have been fascinated with music. Research in the psychology of music has uncovered much regarding how musicians acquire the ability to convey emotional intentions as sounded music, how listeners perceive it as feelings and moods, and how this powerful process relates to social and cultural dynamics. This course addresses these broad themes, giving specific attention to topics such as: development and learning, motivation, expressivity and artistic interpretation, creativity, performance anxiety, listener preferences and emotional response, and the roles of music in society.

189H (Theatre)

Taking the Globe Global: Perspectives on Shakespeare from Around the World

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course, we will read and analyze the text of Shakespeare and examine how Shakespeare's plays are adapted into performances around the world. Centered on four of Shakespeare's major works - A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Twelfth Night - we will explore global approaches to the Comedies and Tragedies through multiple mediums (including theatre, film, and video games), time periods, and cultural lenses. We will investigate how and why the language, characters, and stories in Shakespeare transcend generational and geographic divides, and how the continued translation and transformation of Shakespeare impacts the formation and expression of cultural identities around the globe.

189H (Music)

A World of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 017 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Westbrook 109 Dr. Anthony Bushard ACE 7 or 9

Music making is one of the most important creative processes experienced by people throughout the world. In this class we will explore various types of music made across the globe and how each culture incorporates music into their daily lives. In addition, we will examine the role of the ethnomusicologist and the various ways in which ethnomusicology contributes to our understanding of music. In order to investigate these diverse topics more thoroughly, we will read and discuss texts that engage the music from (for instance) economic, political, social, racial, and gender perspectives. Further, we will experience the music itself through a variety of interactive and participatory media. The class will culminate with a musical ethnography project and presentation wherein students will have the opportunity to explore music making in the greater Lincoln community.

ACE 8: Ethics

189H (Environmental Studies)

From Zika to Flint, Michigan: Public Health and Environmental Justice

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 012 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Knoll 257 Dr. Christine Haney Douglass ACE 8

As the global population grows, and our world becomes increasingly interconnected via processes of globalization, our social and natural worlds are becoming further interwoven. International travel creates a pathway for previously limited outbreaks of disease to spread. The internet creates a pathway for the illumination of once hidden social and ecological crimes. This course will explore contemporary public and environmental health case studies from around the world through the lens of environmental justice. Environmental justice involves the fair and equal treatment and involvement of all people in efforts to care for and access environmental resources. We will investigate current cases of environmental concern in urban areas, remote indigenous communities, local and international law, and the development of local and international public health practices and collaborative efforts.

189H (Advertising & Public Relations)

Why Am I Getting That Ad? Influencing Audiences in a Data-Driven Social Media World

Course description ►

ACE 9: Human Diversity

189H (Theatre)

Games, Festivals, Theatre, and Sports: Cultural Rituals of Performance and Play

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course we will use foundational theories to unpack and understand cultural rituals of performance and play, such as festivals, immersive theatre, video games, and sports. We will investigate the function of performance and play in society, communities, and in our daily lives; we will also investigate how performance and play impact the formation and expression of individual and cultural identities around the globe. We will also look at the role of history, economics, and technology in the international production and circulation of cultural rituals, as well as examine and appreciate their material and aesthetic compositions, narrative representations, and entertainment values. While we will use writing, research, and discussion as our main modes of inquiry, we will also interact with these cultural rituals firsthand through viewing performances and documentaries and playing video games as a part of our course work.

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

Gender, Popular Culture, and Social Movements

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 028 M/W/F 11:30-12:20pm
Knoll 257 Dr. Jennifer Rome ACE 9

Through an examination of movies, music, television, sports, comedy, news, politics, fashion, technology and social media, we will interrogate and seek to understand a wide variety of issues related to gender and social movements. This course is designed to introduce students to historical and contemporary social movements that intersect with gender and social justice through the lens of popular culture. Popular culture representations influence the ways in which people learn about and make sense of contemporary social justice issues. It is important to think critically about how the study of gender and social justice is routed through pop culture and how these representations shape larger meanings and understandings of important issues in society.

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

Gender, Sex, and Race on Trial: Famous Legal Cases in Film

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 029 M/W 6:00-7:15pm
Web Conferencing Dr. Joann Ross ACE 9

In this class, we will learn about notable American trials where sex, gender, race/ethnicity, or disability of a primary character is integral to the legal action. We will then critically evaluate Hollywood’s rendition of those legal events. During the course of the semester, we will learn about legal aspects of trials that that hinge upon complex issues of social identity and what their big screen adaptations reveal about American attitudes towards the legal issues at the heart of these court battles.

Note: This class is offered in web-conferencing format, which means all students join the class on Zoom at the designated times each week.

189H (Anthropology)

Sports, Games, and Leisure: The Anthropology of Getting Fit and Chilling Out

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 003 M/W/F 12:30-1:20pm
Knoll 150 Dr. Blair Zaid ACE 9

In this course, we will explore how and why we are driven to engage in different leisure and recreational activities.

189H (Theatre)

Taking the Globe Global: Perspectives on Shakespeare from Around the World

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course, we will read and analyze the text of Shakespeare and examine how Shakespeare's plays are adapted into performances around the world. Centered on four of Shakespeare's major works - A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Twelfth Night - we will explore global approaches to the Comedies and Tragedies through multiple mediums (including theatre, film, and video games), time periods, and cultural lenses. We will investigate how and why the language, characters, and stories in Shakespeare transcend generational and geographic divides, and how the continued translation and transformation of Shakespeare impacts the formation and expression of cultural identities around the globe.

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

Wonder Women on Screen: American Female Action Heroes

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 030 M/W/F 1:30-2:20pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Tamy Burnett ACE 9

In 2017, the film Wonder Woman offered viewers a refreshingly 21st-century, socially conscious, and feminist conceptualization of what a female action hero could be. For years, movie studios have resisted female-led—never mind female-directed—blockbuster action films. This attitude and absence of many competitors suggest that Wonder Woman stands alone in our popular imagination. In truth, the film’s success is a culmination of a long and fascinating history of female action heroes in American culture. In this class we will explore that history of female action heroes in 20th and 21st century American popular culture, primarily in film and television, but also in other media. We will examine these figures in the comparison to their male counterparts and traditional heroic archetypes, and consider female action heroes within the context of the evolution of feminism(s) and changing attitudes about women’s strength, abilities, and roles in society.

189H (Music)

A World of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 017 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Westbrook 109 Dr. Anthony Bushard ACE 7 or 9

Music making is one of the most important creative processes experienced by people throughout the world. In this class we will explore various types of music made across the globe and how each culture incorporates music into their daily lives. In addition, we will examine the role of the ethnomusicologist and the various ways in which ethnomusicology contributes to our understanding of music. In order to investigate these diverse topics more thoroughly, we will read and discuss texts that engage the music from (for instance) economic, political, social, racial, and gender perspectives. Further, we will experience the music itself through a variety of interactive and participatory media. The class will culminate with a musical ethnography project and presentation wherein students will have the opportunity to explore music making in the greater Lincoln community.