Fall 2020

All new first-year students in the University Honors Program take one 189H seminar in the fall semester of their first year at UNL. These are extremely popular and students often reference these as among their favorite classes at UNL! All seminars are taught by excellent faculty who are passionate about Honors education.

The 189H seminars all meet different ACE (general education) requirements. Before your NSE virtual advising appointment, please review the following course descriptions and identify several that interest you. You and your advisor will discuss which seminars and ACE courses are most appropriate for your degree plan.

Special ENVR 189H for January 2021 3-week session

189H (ENVR)

From Terraforming to Space Exploration: Environmental Ethics in Science Fiction

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 301 MTWRF 12:30-2:30pm, Jan. 4-22, 2021
Meets on Zoom Dr. George Limpert ACE 8

From the stories of Isaac Asimov to successful television franchises like Doctor Who and Star Trek, the genre of science fiction has a long history of examining ethical, social, and moral issues in futuristic and sometimes dystopian settings. Science fiction can be effective at conveying ideas where other approaches may be unsuccessful because complex and often controversial issues are humanized and portrayed in non-contemporary settings where they may be less overt and off-putting to audiences. Humanity faces a myriad of environmental challenges from conservation to climate change, which have been the subject of many science fiction stories. This course will survey how environmental issues have been portrayed through science fiction and the impact on audiences to understand how and why science fiction can be effective where other means of presenting these issues to readers and viewers often fail.

Open to ALL undergraduate students at UNL. Non-Honors students should contact uhon-office@unl.edu for help enrolling.

ACE 2: Oral Communication/Visual Literacy

189H (Communication Studies)

Communication, Stigma, and Support: Talking (and not talking) about our Mental Health

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 008 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Knoll 258 Dr. Angela Palmer-Wackerly ACE 2

There has been a growing interest in improving patient support for overall mental well-being, mental health services, and mental health access. This course examines how and why we talk about mental health on multiple levels (e.g. interpersonal, family, schools, cultural, policy) and how this communication relates to our attitudes and behaviors about mental health. We’ll read and discuss how communication contributes to stigma around certain mental health diagnoses in comparison with others, as well as how communication helps to promote mental well-being. Examining and applying communication theory will be a fundamental part of this course. Assignments include in-class activities, a research paper, and a group project to deepen our understanding of the relationship between communication, support, and mental health.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Exposure to Light: A History of Photography

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 005 M/W 5:00-6:15pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course covers the history of photography from its inception to today, including art photography, documentary, editorial, fashion, feminist, post-modern, multicultural, and digital photography. Discussions of the social, political, and aesthetic uses of photography and imaging, as well as development of important practitioners advance understanding. There will be image-making projects to expand your critical and creative thinking and visual communication skills. Any digital camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to digital SLR), since you will realize your images both digitally and commercially (Walgreens or Walmart). Basic introduction to camera controls and techniques will be covered. Completion of this course gives you knowledge of the history of photography enabling you to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct considered solutions, whether concepts or image-based manifestations.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

The Graffiti Revolution

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 004 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Richards 14 Professor Sandra Williams ACE 2 or 7

From spray-painted graffiti to community murals, from guerrilla street sign campaigns to sidewalk chalking, the wide, wonderful practice of street art (both pre-approved and unsanctioned) has grown in stature and importance in the public consciousness since the mid-1960s--it is a graffiti revolution! In this class, we will explore how graffiti practices highlight the unique relationships that develop between artists, communities, and society-at-large within the urban environment. We will study this public form of expression from early graffiti writing and the birth of hip hop, to its current use as the voice of resistance and protest. Graffiti’s power can be double-edged. Artists contribute to creative placemaking and transforming neighborhoods, but simultaneously can open the door to gentrification. This project-based class facilitates an understanding of the practices, style and struggles of street art by tackling subject matter such intersectionality, the environment, personal expression and public interventions.

No artistic experience is necessary, but an open mind and the ability to embrace experimental practices is expected!

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Plato’s Cave to Selfie: Image Ethics from Classical to Contemporary

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 006 M/W 3:30-4:45pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

The course explores a range of theories in relation to photography, through reading, discussion, and image making, with an emphasis on philosophical ethics of images in terms of production, dissemination, and consumption of images historically and today. While photographs collect the world for our gaze, they are visual dilemmas. From the controversial to mundane, we will consider aspects of photography related to a variety of uses, including war, fashion, art, evidence, commercial, colonial, domestic, and more. There will be several image-making projects designed to develop your critical thinking about philosophical ideas. Any digital camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to digital SLR), as you will realize your images both digitally and commercially (printing photos through Walgreens or Walmart). Basic introduction to camera controls and techniques will be covered. Completion of this course enables you to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct conceptual or image-based solutions.

ACE 4: Natural and Physical Sciences

189H (Biological Sciences)

Exploring Evolution, Cells, and Genomes

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 007 Tu/Th 8:00-9:15am
Knoll 150 Dr. Alan Christensen ACE 4

In this course, we will read and discuss approximately five books describing various aspects of evolution, genetics, cells, the genome and genome modifications. This may include such works as “The Beak of the Finch” by Jonathan Weiner, “Life Ascending” by Nick Lane, “A Crack in Creation” by Jennifer Doudna and Samuel Sternberg, and “A Life Decoded” by J. Craig Venter. Other topics involving the intersection of genetics and evolution may also be covered. Because this is an ACE4 course, we will focus on the scientific method, framing and testing hypotheses, interpretation of data, and drawing and evaluating conclusions. The scientific method is central to all of these topics, and students are expected to thoroughly understand it, and be able to discuss the topics within this framework. Evaluation of student accomplishments will be done by a class presentation, a debate, written assignments, discussion in class, and a final paper.

ACE 5: Humanities

189H (English)

Adventures in Reading

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 010 M/W/F 10:30-11:20am
Knoll 257 Dr. Timothy Parrish ACE 5

Literary achievements are not simply the records, or by-products, of the central beliefs of a culture; they are also a means by which those ideas are created. As much as bricks and mortar, works of written and oral expression are building blocks of human culture. Recognizing this fact, this course returns to ancient, foundational literary works to identify and examine classic truths and trace their evolution into the modern world. In different ways, the epic poems of Homer and Virgil, or the questions Job asks of his G-d and Aeschylus’ Prometheus of Zeus, are foundational works that imagine civilization, poetry, and history as a shared creation that goes forward and back in time through a process of continual creation, and recreation. These works continually ask the reader who you are, to whom do you belong (history? the gods? your family? fate? your own will?), and what constitutes a good life. Where Homer (lliad, Odyssey) and Virgil (Aeneid) are concerned with broad questions of civilization and history, their later readers, Dante (The Inferno, excerpts) and Milton (Paradise Lost, excerpts), Shakespeare (King Lear) and Cervantes (Don Quixote) bring these ancient texts into the modern world by asking the impossible, the inevitable question, who are you? Concluding with Cormac McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic The Road, an answer to Don Quixote that seems more relevant than ever in the age of the Coronavirus, allows to look back on human history to, what were we? The course assumption is that reading is always an act of discovery--you should think of yourself as an explorer, like Dante or Quixote, and the pursuit of learning hopefully a joyful collaboration. In other words, we’re looking to have fun too. Two essay exams, one paper.

189H (Modern Languages & Literatures)

Arab Intellectuals on Love and Gender

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 016 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Knoll 257 Dr. Abla Hasan ACE 5

This course introduces students to different perspectives on love and gender in the Arab world through the eyes of Arab intellectuals. The course provides students a general introduction to the most important books written about love, gender, and sexuality in the Arab world. Students will not only to read those intellectuals’ books but also learn about their life stories, struggles, and their many contributions.

189H (English)

Serial Killer Nation: Sex, Violence, and Trauma in Popular Culture

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 011 M/W/F 1:30-2:20pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Robert Lipscomb ACE 5

Serial killers, both real and fictional, lurk in the recesses of cultural imaginings emerging in an instant as the representation of what is most monstrous in our natures. This course will explore the serial killer phenomenon, especially as it is manifested in the United States. We will examine the fictional role of serial killers in some of the most popular television series of the new millennium, such as CSI, Criminal Minds, and Law & Order: SVU, and the rise of the serial killer anti-hero such as Hannibal Lecter, whose presence in film and on television now spans more than three decades. We will also examine real world serial killers—disconcerting figures such as Dean Corll, John Wayne Gacy, and Jeffrey Dahmer. As we consider what constitutes these individuals, we will respectfully consider their victims and also the distortion of the social fabric that often masks their activities by looking at individuals in their immediate vicinities as well as the society at large. Reading/viewings may include Thomas Harris’s Silence of the Lambs, Poppy Z. Brite’s Exquisite Corpse, television series such as Hannibal and Dexter, and Academy Award winning portrayals of serial killers by Charlize Theron and Anthony Hopkins. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate research including true crime books, news reports, podcasts, television and YouTube documentaries, court documents and police reports, recorded interviews, and scholarly articles from important journals in the fields of psychology and sociology.

189H (Journalism)

Freedom of Speech in Contentious Times

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 015 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Knoll 150 Dr. John Bender ACE 5

Americans cherish the right to say what they think—but they also value other things such as justice, privacy, decency and fairness. Sometimes freedom of expression collides with one of those other rights we value, leading to some interesting and complex conflicts. The right to express ourselves is specifically delineated in the First Amendment and interpreted in hundreds of laws and court cases since the U.S. Constitution was written. This seminar examines the benefits—and costs—of freedom of expression in various parts of American culture. The course stresses that the right to freedom of expression applies to all citizens, not only to the media. Students will be expected to do frequent writing in various formats and to make occasional oral presentations.

189H (History)

Immigrant America: From Homesteaders to Child Migrants

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 014 M/W/F 12:30-1:20pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Laura Muñoz ACE 5

Comic book writer, Frank Miller considers Clark Kent to be the ultimate immigrant—an alien child landed in the U.S.A. Although fictional, Superman’s story closely mirrors the dilemmas immigrants have faced in search of the American Dream. This course will consider immigration and migration from many points of view, from children to lawmakers to activists fighting for and against border walls.

189H (History)

Love, Death, and Power in Pre-Modern Europe

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 013 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Knoll 150 Dr. Carole Levin ACE 5

Love and power are both often deeply desired, and have been throughout history. And death comes to everyone, sometimes much too violently. This course uses case studies based on historical persons and pieces of literature to examine love, death, and power in various time and places in pre-modern Europe, and learn much about historical and literary concerns that still resonate today. Some of the texts and figures we study include Medea, the mythological wife of Jason, who took terrible revenge when he abandoned her; Boudicca, the Celtic Queen who fought the Roman invaders; the murderous Merovingian queen Fredegund; the scholar/cleric Abelard and his brilliant student and lover Heloise; and Lady Jane Grey, executed in the Tower while still in her teens. We will also be reading Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince, Thomas More’s Utopia, and William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing. Assignments include in-class writing, short interpretive essays based on the readings, a 5-8 page research paper, and a creative final.

ACE 6: Social Sciences

189H (Political Science)

All Are Created Equal: The Status of Global Human Rights

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 031 M/W/F 10:30-11:20am
Knoll 257 Prof. Maria Benes ACE 6

This seminar will critically examine issues and controversies related to the growing field of human rights. We will start by examining who decides what constitutes international human rights and how power dynamics come into play in these decisions. We will then discuss types of human rights and the difference between civil and political rights versus economic and social rights. The seminar also covers the role of the United Nations (UN) and international courts in protecting and enforcing international human rights. We will analyze how effective international mechanisms such as UN peacekeeping missions are at preventing human rights abuse in situations of genocide. Finally, the course will incorporate current events such as the COVID-19 pandemic and particular human rights concerns that have increased as a result.

189H (Political Science)

Current Issues in American Politics

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 021 M/W/F 9:30-10:20am
Oldfather 538 Dr. John Gruhl ACE 6

An examination of current and controversial issues in American politics. The first half of the seminar will focus on the size and role of our government, pitting small-government advocates against big-government advocates—those who want to cut government programs versus those who want to continue or expand them. We’ll examine the debates between conservatives and liberals and between Republicans and Democrats. We’ll compare the policies of recent presidents, including those by President Obama and some by President Trump. The second half of the seminar will focus on the polarization of American politics and political parties. Why are we so polarized today, and what are the consequences? In this context, we’ll look at the 2016 presidential election and events since then. We’ll also look at the phenomenon of fake news. For most students, the information presented in class and in the readings will be eye-opening. Even so, the course will be a serious examination of these issues—not simply a “current events” class that discusses the latest headlines or argues hot-button issues. The reading will be substantial, and the writing will entail a series of short papers based on the reading. The course will include lectures and discussions, and all students will participate with questions and comments.

189H (Educational Psychology)

How to Become Creative or Talented

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 009 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Nebraska Hall W129 Dr. Ken Kiewra ACE 6

In this class, we will learn about creative and talented people in various domains and explore the psychological, environmental, social, and biological factors that lead to the development of their creativity and/or talent. This field of study offers many implications for self-growth and education. Students read texts and articles, interview talented in-class guests, complete a book report and article summary, and conduct a small research project.

189H (Political Science)

The Many Faces of Tyranny

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 022 M/W/F 11:30-12:20pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Don Beahm ACE 6

History is full of tyrannical leaders, such as Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolin, Josip Broz Tito, Mao Zedong, many of whom gained power before the full scope of their intentions were clear. As active citizens, we have an obligation to work to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. This course is an analysis and evaluation of the subject of tyranny from multiple points of view. Students will read, discuss, view videos and write about what some of the foremost authorities have had to say about the topic. We will learn from political theorists as ancient as Plato, to Hannah Arendt’s examination of the development of totalitarianism in Nazi Germany, on through to contemporary views of what tyranny is, and how it manifests itself in governments, societies, and individuals.

189H (Psychology)

The Neuroscience of Zombies

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 023 M/W/F 10:30-11:20am
Knoll 150 Dr. Jacquelyn Omelian ACE 6

We all know that zombies aren’t real… right? But what about a parasite that makes mice lose their fear of cats and end up as lunch? Or a virus that makes people terrified of a glass of water? In this class, we’ll sort the fact from the fiction and explore the wonderfully weird world of the brain. Using cases of both real and fictional disorders, we will explore the ways in which the typical brain functions. Along the way we will cover common neuroscience methodologies, important historical contributions, and relevant current theories. By the end of this course you will have developed a broad understanding of the field of neuroscience and be well prepared to repel a zombie apocalypse, should one occur.

189H (Psychology)

The Psychology of Good and Evil

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 024 Tu/Th 2:00-3:15pm
Avery 112 Dr. Chelsea Witt ACE 6

From the earliest historical records, humans have been trying to figure out how some people become heroes and others villains. Explanations have been offered by many religious and philosophical traditions, and laws attempt to legislate exactly what is wrong about some of our strongly-held impulses. This class will examine how we define what is good and evil and will require personal reflection, experiential learning, critical readings, and discussions based on a psychological analysis of why and how we define acts as good or evil. We will conduct this analysis through a lens of different areas of psychology: human development, neuroscience, social relationships, mental illness, the law, and religion. It is the goal of this course to help students view morality in a variety of scientific contexts and equip them to critically reflect on their own moral lives.

ACE 7: Fine Arts

189H (Music)

Digital Music Creation

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 019 Tu/Th 12:30-1:45pm
Ross/Van Brunt 213 Dr. Brian Moore ACE 7

In areas of musical and artistic creativity, digital media has become an important aural and visual palette for expression. The ability to be creative and communicate in an expressive and compelling manner are also important skills in today’s world. The iPad has transformed both the process and product of musical creation. This seminar seeks to (1) understand the expressive aspects of music as an art form through learning to compose and create original music, (2) develop and equip students with the skills and knowledge to use personal and multimedia technology within the context of musical and artistic creation and scholarship, and (3) be an active participant in the research/creative process of the development and deployment of new technologies. NOTE: This seminar requires each student to have access to an Apple iPad. For those enrolled students that do not have an iPad, one will be made available for checkout as well as access to creativity software/hardware for music production, graphic design, and video production.

189H (Music)

Psychology of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 018 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Westbrook 9 Dr. Robert Woody ACE 7

Throughout time, human beings have been fascinated with music. Research in the psychology of music has uncovered much regarding how musicians acquire the ability to convey emotional intentions as sounded music, how listeners perceive it as feelings and moods, and how this powerful process relates to social and cultural dynamics. This course addresses these broad themes, giving specific attention to topics such as: development and learning, motivation, expressivity and artistic interpretation, creativity, performance anxiety, listener preferences and emotional response, and the roles of music in society.

189H (Music)

How to Listen to Pop Songs

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 020 M/W/F 8:30-9:20am
Knoll 257 Dr. David von Kampen ACE 7

Popular music’s visual marketing permeates our culture, with songwriters and bands using images and music videos to catch our attention. But music is made for ears, and pop songs deserve to be considered on their own purely musical terms. In this class we’ll listen to a wide variety of songs—Frank Sinatra to the Beach Boys to Stevie Wonder to Ben Folds to Taylor Swift—and many others in between. We will figure out what makes a great song great, and how new ways of listening can deepen your enjoyment of your favorite music.

189H (Music)

A World of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 017 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Westbrook 109 Dr. Anthony Bushard ACE 7 or 9

Music making is one of the most important creative processes experienced by people throughout the world. In this class we will explore various types of music made across the globe and how each culture incorporates music into their daily lives. In addition, we will examine the role of the ethnomusicologist and the various ways in which ethnomusicology contributes to our understanding of music. In order to investigate these diverse topics more thoroughly, we will read and discuss texts that engage the music from (for instance) economic, political, social, racial, and gender perspectives. Further, we will experience the music itself through a variety of interactive and participatory media. The class will culminate with a musical ethnography project and presentation wherein students will have the opportunity to explore music making in the greater Lincoln community.

189H (English)

Writing the Contemporary Fairy Tale

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 026 Tu/Th 9:30-10:45am
Knoll 257 Dr. Pascha Stevenson ACE 7

Writing the Contemporary Fairy Tale is a workshop-style creative writing class in which we’ll study and practice the art and craft of writing fiction that’s fairy tale inflected. This means we’ll learn the nuts and bolts of fiction writing: characterization, plot, pacing, causality, stakes, conflict, subtext, and syntax. But we’ll also examine fairy tales in both their classic and contemporary forms. Classics from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America will help us appreciate the shape, style, and basic elements of the fairy tale as a particular type of narrative. Contemporary short fiction influenced by fairy tales will provide excellent models for our own writing and help us understand how and why contemporary authors have been attracted to this timeless mode. Writers such as Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, Gabriel García Márquez, Kristy Logan, and Alexander Weinstein demonstrate myriad ways contemporary fiction draws upon (rather than emulates) classic fairy tales for its form and substance.

189H (English)

The Art of Memoir

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 027 M/W/F 2:30-3:20
Knoll 150 Professor Claire Jiminez ACE 7

In this class you will have the chance to reflect on your life and who you are by crafting your own original short non-fiction stories and sharing them with a group of other beginning writers for critique. In order to write better we must also learn how to read as writers with an eye for craft and technique. Throughout the course we will be reading many different memoirs from writer who will inspire and challenge you. You will learn the basic elements of crafting short-nonfiction and how to give thoughtful feedback to classmates on their work. Your critique is just as important as your writing, because it will allow you to articulate your own understanding of craft and to apply that understanding as a critical reader.

189H (Theatre)

Games, Festivals, Theatre, and Sports: Cultural Rituals of Performance and Play

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course we will use foundational theories to unpack and understand cultural rituals of performance and play, such as festivals, immersive theatre, video games, and sports. We will investigate the function of performance and play in society, communities, and in our daily lives; we will also investigate how performance and play impact the formation and expression of individual and cultural identities around the globe. We will also look at the role of history, economics, and technology in the international production and circulation of cultural rituals, as well as examine and appreciate their material and aesthetic compositions, narrative representations, and entertainment values. While we will use writing, research, and discussion as our main modes of inquiry, we will also interact with these cultural rituals firsthand through viewing performances and documentaries and playing video games as a part of our course work.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

The Graffiti Revolution

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 004 Tu/Th 3:30-4:45pm
Richards 14 Professor Sandra Williams ACE 2 or 7

From spray-painted graffiti to community murals, from guerrilla street sign campaigns to sidewalk chalking, the wide, wonderful practice of street art (both pre-approved and unsanctioned) has grown in stature and importance in the public consciousness since the mid-1960s--it is a graffiti revolution! In this class, we will explore how graffiti practices highlight the unique relationships that develop between artists, communities, and society-at-large within the urban environment. We will study this public form of expression from early graffiti writing and the birth of hip hop, to its current use as the voice of resistance and protest. Graffiti’s power can be double-edged. Artists contribute to creative placemaking and transforming neighborhoods, but simultaneously can open the door to gentrification. This project-based class facilitates an understanding of the practices, style and struggles of street art by tackling subject matter such intersectionality, the environment, personal expression and public interventions.

No artistic experience is necessary, but an open mind and the ability to embrace experimental practices is expected!

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Exposure to Light: A History of Photography

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 005 M/W 5:00-6:15pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

This course covers the history of photography from its inception to today, including art photography, documentary, editorial, fashion, feminist, post-modern, multicultural, and digital photography. Discussions of the social, political, and aesthetic uses of photography and imaging, as well as development of important practitioners advance understanding. There will be image-making projects to expand your critical and creative thinking and visual communication skills. Any digital camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to digital SLR), since you will realize your images both digitally and commercially (Walgreens or Walmart). Basic introduction to camera controls and techniques will be covered. Completion of this course gives you knowledge of the history of photography enabling you to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct considered solutions, whether concepts or image-based manifestations.

189H (Art Theory & Practice)

Plato’s Cave to Selfie: Image Ethics from Classical to Contemporary

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 006 M/W 3:30-4:45pm
Knoll 150 Professor Robert Derr ACE 2 or 7

The course explores a range of theories in relation to photography, through reading, discussion, and image making, with an emphasis on philosophical ethics of images in terms of production, dissemination, and consumption of images historically and today. While photographs collect the world for our gaze, they are visual dilemmas. From the controversial to mundane, we will consider aspects of photography related to a variety of uses, including war, fashion, art, evidence, commercial, colonial, domestic, and more. There will be several image-making projects designed to develop your critical thinking about philosophical ideas. Any digital camera is suitable for this class (from cell phone to digital SLR), as you will realize your images both digitally and commercially (printing photos through Walgreens or Walmart). Basic introduction to camera controls and techniques will be covered. Completion of this course enables you to understand, criticize, problem-solve, and construct conceptual or image-based solutions.

ACE 8: Ethics

189H (Environmental Studies)

From Zika to Flint, Michigan: Public Health and Environmental Justice

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 012 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Knoll 257 Dr. Christine Haney Douglass ACE 8

As the global population grows, and our world becomes increasingly interconnected via processes of globalization, our social and natural worlds are becoming further interwoven. International travel creates a pathway for previously limited outbreaks of disease to spread. The internet creates a pathway for the illumination of once hidden social and ecological crimes. This course will explore contemporary public and environmental health case studies from around the world through the lens of environmental justice. Environmental justice involves the fair and equal treatment and involvement of all people in efforts to care for and access environmental resources. We will investigate current cases of environmental concern in urban areas, remote indigenous communities, local and international law, and the development of local and international public health practices and collaborative efforts.

189H (Advertising & Public Relations)

I’m Not Buying It: Examining Truth and Deception in Advertising

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 002 M/W/F 11:30-12:20pm
Knoll 150 Professor Patti Harney ACE 8

Love it, hate it, or love to hate it, advertising is EVERYWHERE – the result of a series of decisions made by ad executives, companies, and even consumers. But how and why are those decisions made and who bears responsibility for them? Where is the line between pulling on heartstrings and emotional manipulation? When does it cross a line to promote brands or products that are dubious or maybe even outright bad for you? This course will enable you to explore the (sometimes) grey area of ethical choices that are faced on a daily basis in Advertising. You will develop your ability to think critically about communicating messages and examine the role of persuasion in the specific context of creating and selling a brand. You’ll learn about various ethical perspectives and pick up some tools that can be applied to all majors and career paths. For example, you’ll learn how to reframe arguments and consider the impact on your audience and society. Even though the topics will be studied through the lens of marketing communications, these skills and abilities transcend disciplines as we are all faced with ethical dilemmas in the world at large.

189H (Advertising & Public Relations)

Why Am I Getting That Ad? Influencing Audiences in a Data-Driven Social Media World

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 001 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Valerie Jones ACE 8

The data generated by online interaction makes it possible to target audiences in more specific ways than ever before—but at what cost? At what point does persuasion cross into manipulation? How can user data be applied to advertising practices responsibly? This course will enable you to become familiar with a variety of ethical issues in advertising and public relations and examine their impact on our current digital society. We will study the tradeoffs of social media engagement and digital communication, including exploration vs. exploitation, freedom vs. control, and convenience vs. privacy. You will develop your ability to think critically about how messages are communicated, who they are communicated to, and what the desired outcomes are. You’ll learn about various ethical perspectives and analytical frameworks through the lens of marketing communications, picking up skills and tools that can be applied throughout your life as a consumer and creator of content.

ACE 9: Human Diversity

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

Gender, Popular Culture, and Social Movements

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 028 M/W/F 11:30-12:20pm
Knoll 257 Dr. Jennifer Rome ACE 9

Through an examination of movies, music, television, sports, comedy, news, politics, fashion, technology and social media, we will interrogate and seek to understand a wide variety of issues related to gender and social movements. This course is designed to introduce students to historical and contemporary social movements that intersect with gender and social justice through the lens of popular culture. Popular culture representations influence the ways in which people learn about and make sense of contemporary social justice issues. It is important to think critically about how the study of gender and social justice is routed through pop culture and how these representations shape larger meanings and understandings of important issues in society.

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

Gender, Sex, and Race on Trial: Famous Legal Cases in Film

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 029 M/W 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Joann Ross ACE 9

In this class, we will learn about notable American trials where sex, gender, race/ethnicity, or disability of a primary character is integral to the legal action. We will then critically evaluate Hollywood’s rendition of those legal events. During the course of the semester, we will learn about legal aspects of trials that that hinge upon complex issues of social identity and what their big screen adaptations reveal about American attitudes towards the legal issues at the heart of these court battles.

189H (Anthropology)

Sports, Games, and Leisure: The Anthropology of Getting Fit and Chilling Out

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 003 M/W/F 1:30-2:20pm
Knoll 150 Dr. Gwyneth Talley ACE 9

In this course, we will explore how and why we are driven to engage in different leisure and recreational activities.

189H (Women's & Gender Studies)

From Wonder Woman to Supergirl: American Female Action Heroes

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 030 M/W/F 2:30-3:20pm
Knoll 258 Dr. Tamy Burnett ACE 9

In 2017, the film Wonder Woman offered viewers a refreshingly 21st-century, socially conscious, and feminist conceptualization of what a female action hero could be. For years, movie studios have resisted female-led—never mind female-directed—blockbuster action films. This attitude and absence of many competitors suggest that Wonder Woman stands alone in our popular imagination. In truth, the film’s success is a culmination of a long and fascinating history of female action heroes in American culture. In this class we will explore that history of female action heroes in 20th and 21st century American popular culture, primarily in film and television, but also in other media. We will examine these figures in the comparison to their male counterparts and traditional heroic archetypes, and consider female action heroes within the context of the evolution of feminism(s) and changing attitudes about women’s strength, abilities, and roles in society.

189H (Music)

A World of Music

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 017 Tu/Th 11:00-12:15pm
Westbrook 109 Dr. Anthony Bushard ACE 7 or 9

Music making is one of the most important creative processes experienced by people throughout the world. In this class we will explore various types of music made across the globe and how each culture incorporates music into their daily lives. In addition, we will examine the role of the ethnomusicologist and the various ways in which ethnomusicology contributes to our understanding of music. In order to investigate these diverse topics more thoroughly, we will read and discuss texts that engage the music from (for instance) economic, political, social, racial, and gender perspectives. Further, we will experience the music itself through a variety of interactive and participatory media. The class will culminate with a musical ethnography project and presentation wherein students will have the opportunity to explore music making in the greater Lincoln community.

189H (Theatre)

Games, Festivals, Theatre, and Sports: Cultural Rituals of Performance and Play

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 025 Tu/Th 6:00-7:15pm
Knoll 258 Professor Fly Jamerson ACE 7 or 9

In this course we will use foundational theories to unpack and understand cultural rituals of performance and play, such as festivals, immersive theatre, video games, and sports. We will investigate the function of performance and play in society, communities, and in our daily lives; we will also investigate how performance and play impact the formation and expression of individual and cultural identities around the globe. We will also look at the role of history, economics, and technology in the international production and circulation of cultural rituals, as well as examine and appreciate their material and aesthetic compositions, narrative representations, and entertainment values. While we will use writing, research, and discussion as our main modes of inquiry, we will also interact with these cultural rituals firsthand through viewing performances and documentaries and playing video games as a part of our course work.