The following 298H seminars are 3 credit hour classes. ACE credit is noted by each course. Enrollment in these courses will follow regular University enrollment procedures and occur on a first-come, first-served basis in accordance with your assigned priority registration times.

Summer 2022

Becoming American

Modern Languages/Interdisciplinary

Becoming American: How Immigrant Identities are Created and Re-Created

Course description ►

Three-week session, May 16-June 3 Section 301 10:00-12:30p, MTWRF
Knoll 257 Profs. Alex Claussen & Emira Ibrahimpašić ACE 9

This interactive Honors seminar will allow students to reflect on the process, experience, and impact for immigrants "becoming American" and explore the tension that sometimes exists between embracing diversity and cultivating a shared American identity and culture. Using Lincoln as a case study, the class addresses an important global challenge: as people move across the world, how do they navigate and define their identities in the face of a multitude of constraints? Students will:

  • examine the inequities that exist for members of immigrant communities and consider solutions that allow new Americans to contribute more meaningfully to community/economic vitality.
  • use food as a means for exploring the ways in which immigrant communities navigate the transition to a new life in the United States.
  • evaluate the importance of storytelling for identity creation – not merely what story is being told, but who is telling it.
  • participate in experiential learning, including field trips in/around Lincoln, guest speakers, and other community engagement.

Fall 2022

Debt, Imperialism, Control

English/Interdisciplinary

Debt, Imperialism, Control: Who Owes What to Whom?

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 003 12:30-1:20pm MWF
Knoll 257 Prof. Julia Schleck ACE 5

How do people and whole countries get trapped by debt? Is requiring repayment an ethical or unethical practice? How does it intersect with power and control? Or the very idea of a society? What do we owe to each other? This course will explore the idea of debt—financial, moral, religious—and examine the ethics of debt in the various way that it plays out in both historical and contemporary contexts. Students will have the opportunity to explore and make a case for the rightness or wrongness of continuing indebtedness in their choice of modern context. Examples might include modern debt slavery, student loan debt, medical debt, reparations, incarceration, or others.

Becoming American

Modern Languages/Interdisciplinary

Becoming American: How Immigrant Identities are Created and Re-Created

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 005 11:30-12:20pm, MWF
Room TBD Prof. TBD ACE 9

This interactive Honors seminar will allow students to reflect on the process, experience, and impact for immigrants "becoming American" and explore the tension that sometimes exists between embracing diversity and cultivating a shared American identity and culture. Using Lincoln as a case study, the class addresses an important global challenge: as people move across the world, how do they navigate and define their identities in the face of a multitude of constraints? Students will:

  • examine the inequities that exist for members of immigrant communities and consider solutions that allow new Americans to contribute more meaningfully to community/economic vitality.
  • use food as a means for exploring the ways in which immigrant communities navigate the transition to a new life in the United States.
  • evaluate the importance of storytelling for identity creation – not merely what story is being told, but who is telling it.
  • participate in experiential learning, including field trips in/around Lincoln, guest speakers, and other community engagement.
How to Build a Starship

Physical Sciences/Interdisciplinary

How to Build a Starship

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 007 2:00-3:15pm, TR
Knoll 257 Prof. Nate Pindell ACE 4

The Earth has been called the cradle of humanity. The only home that humankind has ever known. But are there circumstances that would force humankind to look to the stars as a last resort in the face of extinction? Could humanity become a multi-planet species? What are the current plans for such events? Now more than ever it is important to understand how science and STEM are used to make informed decisions in day-to-day operations and prepare for the future. This course is designed to be a “survey of STEM” in which individuals that may be unfamiliar with many topics in STEM can gain knowledge of the scientific method and the diversity of the disciplines. The course is also trans-disciplinary in nature. The intersection of STEM and non-STEM fields. How is art used in science? What is the science of art? These questions, and more, will be discussed at length in “How to Build a Starship.”

This is not a drill

Natural Resources/Interdisciplinary

This Is Not a Drill: Building Climate Resilient Communities before Disaster Strikes

Course description ►

No.: **** Section 008 10:30-11:20pm, MWF
Knoll 257 Prof. George Limpert ACE 4

From anthropogenic climate change to global pandemics, many of the most serious concerns affecting modern society require scientific guidance to in form effective public policy. The primary objective of this course is to use the scientific method to design plans for improving the resilience of local institutions to the effects of climate change. We will examine the scientific, technological, political, and social concerns that must be weighed to develop effective policy. In the primary class project, your group will examine how climate change and the associated hazards from extreme weather are likely to affect a particular community or institution. Based on the projected impacts from climate change, your group will use structured decision making to examine how a variety of possible mitigation and adaptation strategies will affect stakeholders. From the structured decision making, your group will make a recommendation on how to make your group’s institution or community more resilient to future changes in climate.